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Workshops

Date: Tuesday, September 26, 2017
Time: 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Location: Gerstein Library

Learn how to safely operate the Makerbot Replicator 2 3D printers. You must complete this safety training session before you can use our 3D printers.

3D Printing Safety Training

Date: Tuesday, September 26 4:10pm - 5:00pm

Location: MADLab, Gerstein Science Information Centre, 1 Below, room B112

Presenters: Erica Lenton, Gerstein Librarian & Mike Spears, MADLab Manager

What's Covered: 

- overview of 3D Printing @ Gerstein + MADLab policies & guidelines for use

- instructions for safe & effective use of the 3D printers

- how to prepare a 3D design file for printing 

- basic design principles

Questions?

Send your questions to gerstein.3Dprinting@utoronto.ca or visit our website at: http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/3dprinting

Date: Monday, September 25, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: E.J. Pratt Library

Research and Writing Seminars: Develop Your Scholarly Voice. Each session in this suite of four interactive seminars integrates the learning of academic research and writing skills and is taught by a librarian in collaboration with a writing instructor. The goal of each seminar is to help you develop your own voice as an emerging scholar by enabling you to identify, situate and substantiate your arguments in the context of the scholarly discussion taking place in your discipline. The seminars are designed for humanities and social sciences students, but all are welcome.

Take any three (3) of the four (4) seminars to earn credit on your Co-Curricular Record.

Critical Reading

Learn how to develop critical reading skills and how to incorporate them into the process of research and critical writing. This session concentrates on the skills of analysis and synthesis as they pertain to library research and academic writing. Through short lectures, interactive class discussion and hands-on exercises, you will learn to:

  • Describe the scholarly communication process, including the peer review process
  • Conduct university-level library research and understand the basics of the argumentative essay
  • Identify different types of sources and understand their role in your research process
  • Read strategically to select the best sources and recognize their most important part(s).
  • Employ criteria to evaluate sources for scope, authority and bias

Key terms for this session: Peer review, 3-D Reading, Bloom’s Taxonomy, primary & secondary sources.

Location: E.J. Pratt Library, E-Classroom (room 306) Directions

Other seminars in this series include:

  • Writing to Cite
  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • Literature Reviews
Date: Monday, October 2, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: E.J. Pratt Library

Research and Writing Seminars: Develop Your Scholarly Voice. Each session in this suite of four interactive seminars integrates the learning of academic research and writing skills and is taught by a librarian in collaboration with a writing instructor. The goal of each seminar is to help you develop your own voice as an emerging scholar by enabling you to identify, situate and substantiate your arguments in the context of the scholarly discussion taking place in your discipline. The seminars are designed for humanities and social sciences students, but all are welcome.

Take any three (3) of the four (4) seminars to earn credit on your Co-Curricular Record.

Writing to Cite

Learn how to develop effective strategies for academic research and how to correctly incorporate primary and secondary sources into your essays. Through short lectures, interactive class discussions and hands-on exercises, you will learn:

  • The role of citation practices in the scholarly conversation
  • The various styles of documentation
  • The mechanics of “writing up” your sources
  • The different types of publications and how to integrate and document your use of them
  • To incorporate close reading to develop your own research interests and arguments
  • What ideas you can claim as your own and which ones you cannot
  • How to avoid inadvertent plagiarism

Key terms for this session: close reading, signaling, quoting, paraphrasing

Location: E.J. Pratt Library, E-Classroom (room 306) Directions

Other seminars in this series include:

  • Critical Reading
  • Annotated Bibliographies

Literature Reviews

Date: Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: Map & Data Library

This workshop will introduce you to sources of Canadian data, with a focus on tools for discovering Statistics Canada data, including CANSIM, CHASS Census Analyser, and <odesi>. It will cover search strategies and techniques and allow hands-on time for exploring and discovering data of interest to your own research.

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