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Today's hours for Engineering, Robarts, Gerstein, OISE, UTM, UTSC
8:30am - 11pm
Extended hours service: 12am - 8:30am
8:30am - 11pm
Extended hours service: 11pm - 12am
8:30am - 10:30pm
8:30am - 9pm
8am - 12am
8am - 10:30pm

Workshops

Date: Monday, February 6, 2017
Time: 12:10pm - 1:00pm
Location: Robarts Library

10 Days of Twitter

Join the online scholarly conversation.

Follow us @UofT10DoT         #UofT10DoT         10 Days of Twitter blog

 

Date: Feb. 6-17 - Twitter in (mostly) 10 minutes/day

Workshop format:

  • Day 1: Monday, Feb. 6, 12:10-1:00 - in-person class

Location: Robarts Library, e-classroom, 4th floor, room 4033. Directions.

  • Day 2-5: Feb. 7-10 - Twitter exercises done on your own schedule, approx. 10 minutes/day
  • Feb. 11-12 - weekend off!
  • Day 6-9: Feb. 13-16 - 10 minutes/day
  • Day 10: Feb. 17, 12:10-1:00 - live chat via Twitter

Audience: graduate students (the course is eligible for credit in the Graduate Professional Skills program)

 

Description:

Twitter is a platform for scholarly conversation. It’s used for sharing and discussing research at all stages of the process (even peer review via Tweet!); for current awareness; for networking; for conference participation; and for teaching.

Learn about Twitter and its uses in higher education together with a community of learners, through hands-on practice, class discussion via Twitter, and guided engagement with the public scholarly conversation on Twitter.

By the end of this workshop you will:

  • Be able to navigate the technical aspects of Twitter
  • Understand the breadth of platforms, applications, and devices that can be used with Twitter e.g. Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, Storify
  • Communicate succinctly, framing a point using only 140 characters
  • Understand what it means to be a part of a scholarly conversation in public
  • Begin building a Twitter network of scholars, and gain followers of your own
  • Reflect on your own use of Twitter going forward: in the classroom, at conferences, and throughout the research process

Workshop facilitators:

Eveline Houtman is Coordinator of Undergraduate Library Instruction at Robarts Library and a PhD candidate at OISE. She has published on social media in higher education.

Jesse Carliner is Communications and Reference Librarian, Robarts Library.

 

Questions? Contact Eveline Houtman

 

Date: Monday, January 23, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: E.J. Pratt Library

Research and Writing Seminars: Develop Your Scholarly Voice. Each session in this suite of four interactive seminars integrates the learning of academic research and writing skills and is taught by a librarian in collaboration with a writing instructor. The goal of each seminar is to help you develop your own voice as an emerging scholar by enabling you to identify, situate and substantiate your arguments in the context of the scholarly discussion taking place in your discipline. The seminars are designed for humanities and social sciences students, but all are welcome.

Take any three (3) of the four (4) seminars to earn credit on your Co-Curricular Record.

Critical Reading

Learn how to develop critical reading skills and how to incorporate them into the process of research and critical writing. This session concentrates on the skills of analysis and synthesis as they pertain to library research and academic writing. Through short lectures, interactive class discussion and hands-on exercises, you will learn to:

  • Describe the scholarly communication process, including the peer review process
  • Conduct university-level library research and understand the basics of the argumentative essay
  • Identify different types of sources and understand their role in your research process
  • Read strategically to select the best sources and recognize their most important part(s).
  • Employ criteria to evaluate sources for scope, authority and bias

Key terms for this session: Peer review, 3-D Reading, Bloom’s Taxonomy, primary & secondary sources.

Location: E.J. Pratt Library, E-Classroom (room 306) Directions

Other seminars in this series include:

  • Writing to Cite
  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • Literature Reviews
Date: Thursday, January 26, 2017
Time: 12:10pm - 1:30pm
Location: Robarts Library

Essential Research Skills workshop series

Set yourself up for academic success by learning essential research skills that can help you save time, get better grades, deepen your engagement with your subject, and boost your confidence. Participants learn how to develop successful research questions; how to effectively search for quality resources; how to choose and critically evaluate the best sources; and how to use information responsibly. These are also skills that employers look for in potential employees

Take these workshops individually or take all four for credit in the Co-Curricular Record. Each workshop will be offered several times over the year - check back for more dates.

 

Essential Research Skills: Finding Scholarly Sources

Location: Robarts LIbrary. e-classroom, 4th floor, room 4033. Directions

DescriptionEngaging with the research literature on a topic is essential to your own research, whether you’re writing a paper for an undergraduate assignment or doing original research for your Ph.D. dissertation. Through lecture, discussion and hands-on exercises, this workshop will help you:

  • recognize the characteristics of a scholarly article
  • find scholarly sources more efficiently and effectively
  • select the best places to search for scholarly sources on your topic
  • design an effective search strategy for your topic

Questions? Please contact Eveline Houtman.

Other workshops in the series:

  • Getting Started
  • Choosing the Best Sources for Your Topic
  • Citing and Organizing Your Work

 

Date: Monday, January 30, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: E.J. Pratt Library

Research and Writing Seminars: Develop Your Scholarly Voice. Each session in this suite of four interactive seminars integrates the learning of academic research and writing skills and is taught by a librarian in collaboration with a writing instructor. The goal of each seminar is to help you develop your own voice as an emerging scholar by enabling you to identify, situate and substantiate your arguments in the context of the scholarly discussion taking place in your discipline. The seminars are designed for humanities and social sciences students, but all are welcome.

Take any three (3) of the four (4) seminars to earn credit on your Co-Curricular Record.

Writing to Cite

Learn how to develop effective strategies for academic research and how to correctly incorporate primary and secondary sources into your essays. Through short lectures, interactive class discussions and hands-on exercises, you will learn:

  • The role of citation practices in the scholarly conversation
  • The various styles of documentation
  • The mechanics of “writing up” your sources
  • The different types of publications and how to integrate and document your use of them
  • To incorporate close reading to develop your own research interests and arguments
  • What ideas you can claim as your own and which ones you cannot
  • How to avoid inadvertent plagiarism

Key terms for this session: close reading, signaling, quoting, paraphrasing

Location: E.J. Pratt Library, E-Classroom (room 306) Directions

Other seminars in this series include:

  • Critical Reading
  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • Literature Reviews

News

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Tri-Agency Open Access Policy in effect May 1, 2015.
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The Gerstein Science Information Centre, Canada’s largest health science collection, is seeking new resources to maintain the momentum created by the renewal of the Centre in the year 2000.

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